Professional Training Courses

Registration Type

Full Day
After 10 Sept

Half Day
After 10 Sept

Member

$355

$185

Student Member

$115

$65

Non-Member

$385

$225

Student Non-Member

$125

$75

Full-day Courses
Sunday 17 November 8:00am–5:00pm

PT01—Human Health Risk Assessment: Fundamentals and Practice
PT02—Rational Design of Safer Commercial Chemicals
PT03—Statistical Issues in the Design and Analysis of Ecotox Experiments
PT05—The Endocrine System: Global Perspectives on Testing Methods and Evaluation of Endocrine Activity
PT06—In Vitro Methods for the Determination of Test Chemical Metabolism Utilizing Fish Liver Subcellular Fractions and Hepatocytes

Half-day Courses
Sunday 17 November 8:00am–12:00pm

PT08—Introduction to Freshwater Mollusks and Overview of Their Ecological Role and Laboratory Toxicity Testing Methods

Half-day Courses
Sunday 17 November 1:00pm–5:00pm

PT12—Introduction to Freshwater Mollusks: Use of Laboratory and Field Toxicity Data to Develop Conservation Strategies for Mollusks
PT13—Social and Professional Networking Tools for Science Communication
PT15—iSTREEM®—A Web-based River Chemical Concentration Estimation Model


Course: PT01
Room: Hermitage D
Title: Human Health Risk Assessment: Fundamentals and Practice
Lead Instructor: E. Spencer Williams, Baylor University

In this course, the four instructors will deliver fundamental information on the principles and practice of human health risk assessment, using the traditional four step paradigm. Students in the course will gain an understanding of the process of assessing the exposure of human receptors in occupational and non-occupational settings.  Development of exposure scenarios, including the use of multimedia monitoring and biomonitoring data, will be covered in detail. Special emphasis will be placed on chemical hazard testing and the utility of such data in setting of safety values for all routes of exposure. The essential concepts of risk characterization will be detailed, and the process summarized through the presentation of case studies. A brief discussion of uncertainty and some methods for determining the impacts of uncertainty on risk conclusions will also be included. The importance of communicating potential public health risks, especially in emergency response scenarios, will be discussed in detail.

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Course: PT02
Room: Belmont B
Title: Rational Design of Safer Commercial Chemicals
Lead Instructor: Paul Anastas, Yale University

Concern over the safety of commercial chemicals and the potential for unintended biological activity is steadily growing. Toxicologists and eco-toxicologists have elucidated the range of concerns and have extended the understanding to the molecular level. While chemists have developed extensive skills for designing chemicals with specific industrial or pharmaceutical functions, relatively little consideration is given to minimizing undesired biological activity at the design stage. This course introduces participants to the rational minimization of unintended biological activity by investigating bioavailability, bioactivation and the reactivity with biochemical targets. Special attention will be paid to reactivity, which serves as a molecular trigger for many toxic endpoints such as cancer, narcosis, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity and organ-specific toxicity. Participants will learn how different types of rational design tools, namely property-based design guidelines and computational chemistry tools, can be used to accomplish this goal. The course will interweave advances in mechanistic toxicology, QSARs and environmental chemistry, and discuss the simultaneous optimization of biodegradability. Methods for deriving new rational design strategies from existing data will also be explored, including basic statistical manipulations, mechanistic considerations and computational approaches. Case studies will be used to illustrate the successful application of this rational design approach to commercial chemicals.

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Course: PT03
Room: Lincoln C
Title: Statistical Issues in the Design and Analysis of Ecotox Experiments
Lead Instructor: John Green, Dupont

This course covers statistical considerations of experimental design and statistical analysis used to evaluate toxicity of chemicals in the environment. Both hypothesis testing to determine a NOEC and regression modeling to determine an ECx will be developed in detail. The discussion will include advantages and disadvantages of both approaches and their use in risk assessment. The lead instructor works closely with OECD and USEPA, is an active member of the OECD Validation Management Group for Ecotoxicity and was instrumental in developing several new OECD Test Guidelines and new methodology and these will be discussed. Both instructors have worked on several other multi-disciplinary teams developing regulatory statistical guidance. Continuous, quantal, and severity score (histopath) data will be explored. The instructors have decades of practical experience designing and analyzing ecotoxicity experiments, performing risk assessments, and dealing with related regulatory issues and drew on that experience in developing this class. Underlying principles will be discussed, but the focus will be on practical issues. All topics will include illustration by real laboratory ecotoxicity data examples illustrating the relevant points and techniques. Logical flow-charts for NOEC determination and for regression model fitting will be presented, as well as some discussion of software to conduct analyses.

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Course: PT05
Room: Hermitage C
Title: The Endocrine System: Global Perspectives on Testing Methods and Evaluation of Endocrine Activity
Lead Instructor: Ellen Mihaich, Environmental and Regulatory Resources

In response to the concern that certain environmental chemicals could be interfering with the endocrine system of humans and wildlife, regulations have been promulgated in various regulatory bodies around the world to target the evaluation of these types of effects. The purpose of this short-course is to address key topics related to endocrine system evaluation and regulatory requirements around the world. The course will provide basic information on the vertebrate endocrine system, mechanisms of control, and adverse effects. The focus of the endocrine system presentation will be the estrogen, androgen, and thyroid systems. The requirements of the US EPA’s Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program, as well as those for REACH and other regulatory initiatives around the world, including the development of definitions and criteria in the EU, will be reviewed. Specific screens and tests used in these programs will be discussed, including plans for the evolution of the US EPA program, such as EDSP21 and the development of adverse outcome pathways. Use of weight of evidence evaluations in interpreting the data will be covered.  Finally, an interactive simulation will be staged where small groups of participants can engage in a transparent and quantitative weight of evidence evaluation of data.

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Course: PT06
Room: Vanderbilt University (Transportation will be provided from the Opryland Hotel)
Title: In Vitro Methods for the Determination of Test Chemical Metabolism Utilizing Fish Liver Subcellular Fractions and Hepatocytes
Lead Instructor: Karla Johanning, KJohanning Consultancy LLC

The main goal of this professional training course is to provide the basic laboratory tools and knowledge to perform in vitro metabolism assays utilizing fish liver subcellular fractions and hepatocytes. There is increasing interest in utilizing alternative methods to evaluate the bioaccumulation potential of chemicals. Bioaccumulation is the biological sequestering of xenobiotics and is the result of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) processes. The in vitro metabolism assay utilizing fish liver subcellular fractions (i.e. S9 (Johanning et al, 2012), microsomes) and hepatocytes (freshly isolated or cryopreserved) provide a powerful tool to determine metabolism of a vast variety of chemicals. In vitro methods to measure the metabolism of chemicals are available, and have been used for decades in drug development. These in vitro methods offer alternative methods that are less costly, decreases the number of animals utilized, and can be performed in significantly less time than in vivo methods. In vitro methods provide the initial steps to test the overall metabolism of chemicals that are be under REACH regulation. The purpose of this professional training course is to demonstrate and have the participants perform incubations with the appropriate materials and reagents to test metabolism of chemicals using fish liver subcellular fractions and hepatocytes. In addition, sample results will be used to demonstrate the calculation of metabolic rate and use in the in vitro to in vivo extrapolation model improved by Nichols et al. (2013).

Please plan to arrive at the SETAC registration desk by 7am to pick up your registration materials. A bus will leave at 7:15am to take all participants to Vanderbilt University, where the course will take place, and will return at approximately 6:00pm. Onsite registrations will not be accepted after the bus has departed. Lunch will also be provided.

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Course: PT08
Room: Hermitage E
Title: Introduction to Freshwater Mollusks and Overview of Their Ecological Role and Laboratory Toxicity Testing Methods
Lead Instructor: Ferrella March, Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality

Freshwater mollusks including mussels and snails are diverse and geographically widespread. Approximately 10% of this remarkable fauna has apparently become extinct in historical times and about half of the remaining 900 species are of conservation concern. Presently 100 freshwater mollusk species are listed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as Threatened or Endangered, and hundreds more may warrant listing. Factors that may be contributing to these declines include habitat alteration, introduction of exotic species, over-utilization, disease, predation, and contaminants. Unique life histories of mollusks results in a wide variety of exposure routes for toxicants. For example, early life stages of freshwater mussels are unusually sensitive to some important toxicants, including ammonia and copper. The short course is the first of two half-day courses. This introductory course will provide an overview of: (1) life stages, reproduction,feeding, and the ecological role of freshwater mussels and snails; (2) methods for culturing and propagation of freshwater mussels and snails; 3) conservation significance of freshwater mussels and snails relevant to numbers and distribution of protected taxa, consideration for conservation actions and sensitivity to pollutants; and 4) methods for conducting toxicity assessments with freshwater mussels and snails.

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Course: PT12
Room: Hermitage E
Title: Introduction to Freshwater Mollusks: Use of Laboratory and Field Toxicity Data to Develop Conservation Strategies for Mollusks
Lead Instructor: Farrella March, Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality

Freshwater mollusks including mussels and snails are diverse and geographically widespread. The native North American freshwater mollusk fauna included 16 families and over 1000 species (roughly 300 bivalves and 700 snails). Approximately 10% of this remarkable fauna has apparently become extinct in historical times and about half of the remaining 900 species are of conservation concern. Presently 100 freshwater mollusk species are listed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as Threatened or Endangered, and hundreds more may warrant listing. Factors that may be contributing to these declines include habitat alteration, introduction of exotic species, over-utilization, disease, predation, and contaminants. Unique life histories of mollusks results in a wide variety of exposure routes for toxicants. For example, early life stages of freshwater mussels are unusually sensitive to some important toxicants, including ammonia and copper. This short course is the second of two half-day courses. This course will provide an overview of: (1) use of freshwater and snail toxicity data, derivation of benchmarks and risk assessment; 2) use of freshwater mussel data in conservation planning; 3) assessing effects on mollusk populations including monitoring and mortality incident investigation, in situ testing, contaminant accumulation studies, and biomarker studies.

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Course: PT13
Room: Presidential Boardroom B
Title: Social and Professional Networking Tools for Science Communication
Lead Instructor: Sarah Bowman, Ohio State University

Do you ever wonder how you can become better connected and engage with colleagues, collaborators, students, and the general public? With greater than 50% of North Americans using social media (http://wearesocial.net), and an even greater number among those under 30 years of age, this is an important time for scientists to use these resources to share their science with colleagues and the general public. In this professional training course, SETAC students who understand the value of social media within our discipline, will introduce you to the ways in which social (and professional online) media can help you, your lab, or your organization better network and engage with your peers and the public. We will familiarize participants with the networking features of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, the new SETAC website, Mendeley, and Research Gate, and explain how to use these various social media websites in science. We will cover basics including account management, privacy, ethics, and other concerns. We encourage all participants to bring their laptops to engage in a hands-on workshop as part of the course.

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Course: PT15
Room: Belmont A
Title: iSTREEM®—A Web-based River Chemical Concentration Estimation Model
Lead Instructor: Paul DeLeo, American Cleaning Institute

iSTREEM® is a web-based computer model that predicts the concentration of a chemical used in ‘down-the-drain’ products in more than 10,000 wastewater treatment plants throughout the coterminous USA, their resultant mixing zones, riverine concentrations and drinking water intake concentrations downstream of wastewater discharges. The model has been scaled at both the national level (e.g., approximately 30,000 river reaches covering over 200,000 river miles) and at the regional/watershed scales (e.g., Trinity River, TX; Willamette River, OR). iSTREEM® is a valuable new tool being made available to the public by the American Cleaning Institute to promote product stewardship and regulatory compliance for chemical suppliers and manufacturers of formulated products of all sizes. Attendees will be provided access to iSTREEM® for future use (at no cost) along with the underlying principles of its development and the necessary training to run simulations and manipulated the generated output.

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